Living Room 
for Kvadrat

2020

Designed in collaboration with Joseph Guerra.

Currently exhibited at Kvadrat’s headquarters in Ebeltoft, Denmark; at present, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the exhibition is available for viewing digitally.

Project Team:
Chris Crowley,
Evan Dempsey

Project Assistants:
Elie Fazel,
Estelle Rougerie

Images:
Kvadrat

After three successful design projects editions, Kvadrat is delighted to announce the commissioning of Knit! — a series of works by 28 different designers exploring the potential of knitted textiles by Kvadrat Febrik. Designers have been chosen from across the world to create pieces with Kvadrat Febrik textiles as the protagonist. These designs probe material possibilities with pieces that explore the boundaries of textile use. Selected by curators Anniina Koivu, Jeffrey Bernett, Johanna Agerman Ross, Njusja de Gier, and Renee Merckx, the participating designers have been chosen from the fields of industrial and product design, craft, graphics, and fashion. The designers were chosen for their ability to experiment and play with the potential of knitted fabrics.

Knit! is the fourth edition of Kvadrat’s Design Projects, following iterations dedicated to Kvadrat’s Hallingdal 65, Divina, and Canvas textiles.

This project was initiated by research into the history of dining and seating in the Middle East, which differs starkly from the Western style. Seating is low, often on the floor, and arranged at the perimeter of a room. Fundamental to this style are compositional color landscapes created through the layering of textiles and borne from the interplay of colors in nature and their inherently complex relationships.

Living Room is a re-interpretation of the family table, imagined as a place where one might gather for tea or to play cards. The color selections are informed by the histories of these traditions; a blue central pedestal references to the reflecting pool often found in early Islamic architecture, and the warm hues that surround it are influenced by the colors of regional textiles in these areas. The incorporation of these elements work to create a familial warmth, combining a nod to the past with a look into the future.